kateordie:

boom-yummy:

meeshyarts:

Some new halloween shirts for this year + 1 old spoopy.

—-

2 Spoopy: Unisex || Tank

Lookin’ Cute, Feelin’ Spooky: Unisex || Tank || Baseball 

Lazy Spider Costume: Unisex || Tank || Baseball Tee

Deep Down Inside We Are All Spoopy Skeletons: Orange Tank || Tank || Baseball Tee

Let’s Get Sheet Faced: Unisex || Tank || Baseball Tee

Trick or Treating Till I Die : Unisex || Tank || Long Sleeved Raglan

Attn:
spookychan

Eeeee

(via wgetsandcurls)

tamorapierce:

chewiesmiles:

via Mike Brown: Facts and dog whistles by Jonathan Korman (@miniver)

Part I here

I don’t care if he was smoking a doobie a mile long, it wasn’t a shooting offense.  Stealing cigars, if true, wasn’t a shooting offense.  He could have been letting air out of the tires of the chief’s fucking tires and it still wouldn’t be a shooting offense, you know why?  THERE IS NO CRIME IN THIS COUNTRY THAT IS A SHOOTING OFFENSE.  Even if he’d been jailed, arraigned, gone through all the procedures of court for felony murder in a death penalty state, been found guilty and exhausted all of his appeals, no one could shoot him.  As it was, he was walking down the street.

Walking.  Because that’s what dangerous guilty horrible criminal persons do in this country, friends and neighbors, they walk down the street, ignoring the police officer in such a perverse, vicious, and heinous manner that the police officer, protecting and serving his tightly gripped ass off, shoots him.  Multiple times.  Because everyone knows the white policeman would never just plain haul off and shoot an innocent man in these United Racist States.

I hate this.  There will never be justice here.  Never.

(via wgetsandcurls)

anemated:

tmirai:

Foam and Worbla armour MEGA TUTORIAL

Tutorial by AmenoKitarou

Super duper awesome and helpful! I am totally going to try this out for my Garrosh cosplay.

Very handy tutorial, I’m keeping this

I’m keeping this.

(Source: alltheawesomecosplay, via wgetsandcurls)

anigrrrl2:

pastel-gizibe:

forcoloredgirlswhodgaf:

cultureunseen:

Charda Gregory abducted, humiliated, violated, restrained, scalped and tortured. 
If this were reversed, with black police officers who were sworn to uphold peace and justice but instead were documented victimizing a white woman (who was already a victim), this news would have trumped the Olympics!

Truncated version: drugged at a party, abducted to a motel, wakes up during unwanted sexual violation in a motel room full of strangers, fights like hell to escape, motel employee calls the authorities, she gets arrested for destroying motel property and it just gets worst from there.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IoBLolqUaNg 

Every officer who participated in it and even those who witnessed it and did nothing should be punished but instead they just fired the woman?
No rape kit, no police report on the people inside the motel room, no investigation of her claims, no accountability for missing motel entry records, no video from the motel but she gets detained for fourteen days?

(Btw, when did your tax dollars begin purchasing Abu Ghraib type water boarding chairs?)

http://www.wxyz.com/news/local-news/investigations/cut-on-camera-cop-slices-off-young-mothers-artificial-hair

I get angrier and angrier everyday when I see things like this.

What the FUCK. What in the bloody fuck is this?

What the fuck is this shit? First she gets drugged, abducted, and raped, AND THEN THEY ARREST HER FOR DESTRUCTION OF PROPERTY WHILE THE RAPISTS/KIDNAPPERS GET OFF! What the FUCK?!?! 

AND THIS HAPPENED 15 MINUTES FROM MY PARENTS HOUSE!!

(via wgetsandcurls)

micdotcom:

For many Muslim Americans, 9/11 was a double punch of tragedy and bigotry

The actions of 19 Islamic extremists on 9/11 left an indelible mark on America. Today, millions pause to commemorate the attacks’ 13th anniversary, to honor the victims and to remember that all life is special and sacred. But there’s an untold story amid the many speeches and moments of silence — one filled with a different kind of pain, grief and strong sense of loss. 

Those stories are now being told on social media

(via wgetsandcurls)

danithedoommagnet:

seraphimkin:

censwh0re:

everyone check your music apparently the new U2 album downloaded onto everyone’s iPhone hahhah I’m dying

image

IT’S HERE

what the fuck. what the fuck is this. what. oh my god. how.

what.

apple what the fuck

So this happened to my phone as well!

(via wgetsandcurls)

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential
When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.
But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.
Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.
The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.
Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.
From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”
“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.
While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.
When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.
“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.
A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.
“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”
Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.
“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.
As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.
The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.
Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.
Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses
Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.
Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential

When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.

But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.

Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.

The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.

Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.

From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”

“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.

While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.

When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.

“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.

A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.

“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”

Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.

“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.

As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.

The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.

Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.

Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.

Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

(via wgetsandcurls)

mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers:

raresenses:

nappynomad:

socialjusticekoolaid:

The Ferguson City Council convened for the first time since Mike Brown’s death, and proved that they literally give no fucks about what the community has to say. Added to their vague, paltry proposed reforms, seems real change will have to come in Ferguson via the ballot box. I don’t care where you live folks— let this be a lesson in voting/participating in your local elections and government! #staywoke #farfromover 

My people getting it!

these people are the real heroes. not the military, not politicians, not the Hollywood actors. they risked their lives and livelihoods to challenge white supremacy and institutionalized racism.

God bless them

(via fayekathaleen)

yall-mothafuckas-need-misha:

howtumblrruinedmylife:

andro-saurus:

violentxfemmes:

kirkwa:

And This Is Why You Shouldn’t Get Sick In America

Many believe that the US healthcare system is the best in the world. Not so according to the World Health Organization’s ranking of the world’s health systems. The US doesn’t even rank in the top 25. It ranks 37th and is the most expensive in the world. I would argue that even if we had the best healthcare system in the world, what good is it, if no one can afford to access it.

Most companies are buying 60/40-policys for their employees these days, but even if you are lucky enough to have good insurance with 80/20-policy coverage, that 20 percent your responsible for can drive you right into bankruptcy as easily as the 60-40 policy given the cost of healthcare.

Insurance cost have been going up dramatically in the last two decades, long before the new Affordable Healthcare Act has taken affect, in some cases as much as 35% per year.

But have you noticed the latest trick the insurance companies have roll out?

Yes, Higher Deductible… most averaging $5,000 per year, per person, but I have seen some as high as $10,000 per year. For those of you that are wondering, this tactic is specifically designed too stop you from using your insurance. It reduces the insurance companies out of pocket liability by shift costs onto consumers, especially those dealing with chronic illness such as diabetes and arthritis. Consequently, because consumers can’t afford the deductible they will avoid necessary care to save money.

Although insurance companies are a problem, the real crocks is the healthcare system it self. A corrupt and bloated system desperately in need of reform!

This is absolutely ridiculous.

I live in New Zealand. My mum had a heart attack when I was 13, she was in hospital for at least 3 months and our government pays for most of our bills so I think my parents only had to pay around about $500 - 1k. With the option to pay it over a period of time.

Like????? Does the America government even give the slightest fuck about the people that live in their country???? Honestly.

No. They don’t.

You know, I live in Germany. 8,2 % of my monthly income (before taxes and insurance) is paid to my health insurance by law. That’s 230 € a month. My employer has to pay 7,3 % of my income, that’s 207 €, to my health insurance.

I don’t need 230 € a month for health care or medicine, so technically I’m paying without getting anything. I’m healthy. I don’t need surgery in the forseeable future and hopefully won’t for a long time.

But those 230 € buy some elderly folks their monthly diabetes and arthritis pills. They pay for a woman giving birth at the local hospital. They pay for some victim of a car accident who needs surgery.

And I gladly pay those 230 € a month. Because while I pay for other people - when I’ll give birth, have an accident, or need pills for some disease, I know it won’t cost me a single cent. Really, that’s how that works here. We pay for each other. And that’s what I’m gladly paying for: the security to know that when I need medical treatment, I’ll get it for free.

And how America still thinks that’s “taking away people’s right to choose their own health care” is unbelievable to me. Because they’re not giving people freedom of choice, they’re forcing them to stay home sick instead of going to the emergency room when they’re in dire need of treatment, because they can’t afford it.

I’d rather be “forced” into mandatory insurance.

That’s actually very interesting to me because every time I bring something like that up, my dad gets pissed and says he shouldn’t have to pay for someone else’s healthcare. I can’t understand why he wouldn’t want to because this man is diabetic and as a result has spent a lot of time in the hospital. I don’t see why he wouldn’t want that to be paid for??? He’s constantly pissed off about how much his diabetic supplies cost and I just????

He acts like he alone would be paying for all the healthcare in the country and I don’t think he understands what teamwork means??

He also thinks people will take advantage and just not get jobs or something and like???? If healthcare is paid for, that doesn’t mean everything else is paid for as well.

The US needs universal healthcare!

(via wgetsandcurls)